Hey, I Could Use Some Help

I’ve been looking at the books Daughter of Atlas will be competing with in SPFBO 4.  Here’s the Goodreads list.

There are some very experienced indie authors on this list, I see, as well as some noobs like myself.  The competition is strong.  Just glancing at the list, I see Daughter of Atlas has only a one-star rating!  This is because only one person has given it a star rating, and that rating is one star.  (As I understand it, some people on Goodreads like to mark their “to be read” books with a one-star rating. Yes, that’s it!)

So, it looks kind of bad to see that one star in there among all those three- and four-star ratings.  I’m hoping you can help me with that.  If you read and enjoyed Daughter of Atlas, and have a Goodreads account, hop on over there and give the book a rating of more than one star.  Whatever you think is an accurate rating.  (A review would be nice to, if you have the time.)

I’d just like the book to make a better first impression on Goodreads, for the judges, and anyone who might be following the contest.

Thanks! I really appreciate the help.

DoA in SPFBO 4

I’ve decided to do something fun with my book Daughter of Atlas. I hope you’ll follow along.

I’ve entered into the Self-Published Fantasy Blog-Off 4, a big book review tournament for, as noted, indie-published fantasy novels.  It was created by indie author Mark Lawrence.  Eight bloggers or teams of bloggers will review 300 books. Each team will choose one semi-finalist to be read and reviewed by all the blog teams.  The final winner wins, well, the title of SPFBO 4 winner, fame and hopefully fortune.

My book was assigned to Team Weatherwax, and Tome & Tankard is the actual blog that will review my book.  Wish me luck!

You can follow SPFBO 4 on Facebook if you’d like to stay apprised of the contest.

And here’s a Goodreads list of all the competing books. And a list of the books for Team Weatherwax here.

I’m very happy and excited to be a part of this, and I’d like to thank Mark Lawrence, all the bloggers, and also all the authors for taking part in this wonderful opportunity for the indie book community.

The contest will begin in August.  I’ll keep you apprised.

NanowriNO

I’m not doing Nanowrimo this year.   This is because I am already steadily working on something, my solarpunk novella, and I’d be a fool to dump that just in order to write a random NaNovel I’m not really into, because it’s November.

Some people use Nanowrimo to push themselves to work on something they already have on deck.  That’s fine, and I’ve done that before, too.  But I don’t feel the need to push myself to do 1667 words a day on the novella.  I am happy with the 500 words a day I am currently doing. Besides (please god!) there aren’t 50,000 words left in the novella, so I wouldn’t be able to “win” Nanowrimo anyway, and that’s always a letdown.  I’ve done it six times, and won it three times, so I don’t want to pull my average down less than 50 percent!

I do feel a little sad and nostalgic that I’m not doing it.  I have a fondness for Nanowrimo after all.  Daughter of Atlas was my first NaNovel, way back in the day.  I miss the crazy camaraderie that comes from it, online and IRL. The past couple years I have run a series of Nanowrimo programs at my library, write-ins and pep talks, in which I would join the attendees in NaNoveling.  That was fun.  But there’s so much going on at my branch this November, other programs, major programs, and an election (my library is a polling place.)  I can’t really wedge the write-ins in there, so that dampened my enthusiasm for the project too.  A couple people in my writing workshop are first-timers and asked me if I was doing it too, and I’m sorry I can’t be there to help them.

But the fact is, the solarpunk is going well and I shouldn’t try to tamper with what’s currently working in order to meet an abstract ideal of “doing Nanowrimo.”  That’s missing the point completely.  Besides, there’s always next year.

So, good luck, those that are doing it.  You can always message me if you have any questions or need advice.  I’ll join you next year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Penstra Profile

The writing software Penstra has a short profile of me up today: here’s the link:

Penstra

Penstra is a web-based writing software.  I haven’t studied it in detail yet, but it seems to have a lot of features.  I do know the basic level is free. So check it out.

500 Words

Following the publication of my novel, Daughter of Atlas, I’ve started working on a new project.  It is a solarpunk novella for a shared world anthology, with a couple friends.  I have been working on it pretty consistently, and I feel pretty good about it.

I write 500 words a day.

I’ve always struggled with writing consistently.  Indeed, I stopped writing at all for almost ten years.  I was feeling too burned out and beaten down.  So I know I won’t ever be able to make a paying career out of this, but that’s okay. I’ve started again, that’s the thing.

But even in my not-writingest periods, I’ve always known that you need to write every day to make a go of it.  And not just dicking around in your journal, either.  You need to write something that you hope or intend for people to read, every day, to produce work and to improve.

It is only now that I have come to do that. Write every day.  I want to now, like I didn’t want to before.  (The book The War of Art by Stephen Pressfield helped me understand my not-wanting, and confront it. I recommend it.) And the amount that I’m writing is 500 words.

So far, it’s working for me, because it’s such a small amount.  One page.  It is extremely hard to talk myself out of writing it.  It would be embarrassing. 500 words. Come on, man.  Embarrassing to not write it.  One page. Hard to rationalize blowing off a single page.  That’s the key, so far. That’s what’s working for me.

To be honest, I don’t write every day.  I write in the evenings, because I’m just not a morning person.  And I close at work one day a week, so I don’t get home until late. I usually don’t write then.  And my writer’s workshop is on Thursdays, and then I don’t get home until almost ten.  No writing then.

But I write most nights.  And every night that I do, I have 500 words more than I did the night before.  It’s good enough. Far better than all the many nights when I had no words. 300 nights of 500 words makes a novel. How do you eat an elephant?  One 500-word bite at a time.